The Practice Test for Typing and Data Entry

Dvorak Typing Lesson 01: N & O Keys

Instructions

Begin with your fingers on the home row. The home row is the middle row of letters on your keyboard.

  • Your left index finger rests on the ‘F’ key, and your right index finger rests on the ‘J’ key.

These keys are usually marked with a raised dot or dash to help you find the keys without looking. The rest of your fingers line up in the adjacent keys – shown highlighted in the illustration below.

picture of dvorak keyboard with the home row keys highlighted
  • The ‘N’ key is under your right ring finger. (see keys highlighted below)
  • The ‘O’ key is under your left ring finger. (see keys highlighted below)
dvorak keyboard with letters N and O highlighted
  • Once you learn where these keys are, try to type them without looking at your fingers. To make a capital letter, press the shift key with the pinky finger of your other hand at the same time as you press the letter key. Scroll down if needed to type the following:
  • When you feel confident you can type these keys without looking, go on to the next lesson.

Check Your WPM Typing Speed Here

To find out how fast you type, just start typing in the blank textbox on the right of the test prompt. You will see your progress, including errors on the left side as you type.

You can fix errors as you go, or correct them at the end with the help of the spell checker. If you need to restart the test, delete the text in the text box. Interactive feedback shows you your current wpm and accuracy.

In order to complete the test and share your results, you need to get 100% accuracy. You can review your progress for this session with the feedback chart below. Just hover over a dot to see what your average speed and accuracy are for that key.

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Personalized Feedback

This feedback graph will follow you from page to page for your typing session. You can see more details by mousing over the graph. The session is reset when the tab on your browser is closed.

Accuracy Key:
96-100%
86-95%
76-85%
66-75%
51-65%
0-50%

Letter Drills

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

More about the Dvorak Keyboard Layout

Dvorak is a keyboard layout for English patented in 1936 by August Dvorak and his brother-in-law, William Dealey, as a faster and more ergonomic alternative to the QWERTY layout. Dvorak proponents claim that it requires less finger motion and as a result reduces errors, increases typing speed, reduces repetitive strain injuries, or is simply more comfortable than QWERTY.

Although Dvorak has failed to replace QWERTY, most major modern operating systems allow a user to switch to the Dvorak layout. iOS does not provide a system-wide, touchscreen Dvorak keyboard, although third-party software is capable of adding the layout to iOS, and the layout can be chosen for use with any hardware keyboard, regardless of printed characters on the keyboard.

Several modifications were designed by the team directed by Dvorak or by ANSI. These variations have been collectively or individually termed the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard, the American Simplified Keyboard or simply the Simplified Keyboard, but they all have come to be known commonly as the Dvorak keyboard or Dvorak layout.